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Public Lands

HW Winter2018 FINAL2cover

Colorado's public lands are faced with new challenges but water and land management depend on working together. Read about the relationship between water and land in Colorado and how Coloradans are converging to restore Colorado's public lands in the Spring 2018 issue of Headwaters magazine.

Browse articles and find a flipbook of the magazine here.

Connecting the Drops

connectingdropslogo4.1Bringing you the reporting you crave over the radio airways with extras and archives on our website. Visit the audio archives or listen to the latest story on the connection between Colorado's forests, watersheds, and forest fires:

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Water Education Colorado

CoverImagePlanet earth gives us more than a place to hang our hats. From forests that regulate the water cycle and the climate, to wetlands that cycle nutrients and act as natural filtration systems, the complex interactions that occur within living ecosystems provide essential services that directly support, not only our very existence, but our quality of life and our livelihoods as well. Us Earthlings are utterly dependent on the continued persistence of Earth’s diverse ecosystems, in all their amazing complexity. 

In this issue of Headwaters, Water Education Colorado looks at the power of valuing "ecosystem services" from wetland mitigation banks to ranchers-as-conservationists as innovative tools to protect the functions of natural systems for the good of mankind, as well as Colorado.

Read selected articles below, or view the online version here.

The Power of Ecosystem Services

Why conservationists are translating “environmental integrity” to read “human quality of life”

By Jayla Poppleton

 The great wonder of the blue planet is that life is made possible. From forests that regulate the water cycle and the climate, to wetlands that cycle nutrients and act as natural filtration systems, to bats and butterflies and bees that pollinate crops that we harvest for food, the complex interactions that occur within living ecosystems provide essential services that directly support, not only our very existence, but our quality of life and our livelihoods as well.

 While as a species, Homo sapiens have grasped at some level the need to harvest the Earth’s resources sustainably, to conserve biodiversity for future unknowns, and to stabilize the climate, the question remains: Have we truly accepted our utter dependence on the continued persistence of Earth’s divers eecosystems, in all their amazing complexity?

 Although the concept of this dependence and the need to protect these natural systems for their related functions and values isn’t new, there is a growing cadre of natural and social scientists and economists who have joined forces to promote a slightly altered version of conservation, tapping an instinct greater than philanthropy or moral imperatives: that of human survival and well-being.

Read more: The Power of Ecosystem Services

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 And view the latest issue of Headwaters Pulse, Water Education Colorado's monthly e-newsletter, here.

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Click the icons below for videos about climate change, ranching and more; or audio from Water Education Colorado's Connecting the Drops radio series.

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