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Alt. Water Transfers

Cover HW Fall 2017

Water sharing and banking, coined "alternative transfer methods" or ATMs, could provide flexibility for stretched water supplies —but not without marked challenges. Read the Fall 2017 issue of Headwaters magazine and explore options to:

  • keep water in farming
  • help municipalities plan ahead
  • share between ag and environmental uses
  • bank water on the Colorado River

Browse articles and find a flipbook of the magazine here.

Connecting the Drops

connectingdropslogo4.1Bringing you the reporting you crave over the radio airways with extras and archives on our website. Visit the audio archives or listen to the latest story on the National Wild and Scenic Rivers Act and the Colorado river that could become the state's second wild and scenic protect river—Deep Creek:

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Water Education Colorado

hwcover16Explore the state and meet Coloradans who are devoted to protecting wildlife through this issue of Headwaters.

Read through select articles below or view the full wildlife issue of Headwaters online.

The Upper Colorado Endangered Fish Recovery Program

The Upper Colorado Endangered Fish Recovery Program, established 20 years ago, is a collaborative effort to restore four endangered fish species and continue water development in compliance with state and federal laws and interstate compacts.

Read more: The Upper Colorado Endangered Fish Recovery Program

Lost: Historic Call Found: Creative Solution

Story by Peter Roessmann

In the early morning hours of June 20th, 2007, a 98-year-old section of penstock gave way, unleashing a torrent of water on the Shoshone Power Plant in Glenwood Canyon. The penstock, a riveted steel tube directing diverted Colorado River water into the plant's turbines, was a victim of undetected corrosion.

Read more: Lost: Historic Call Found: Creative Solution

What a Nuisance

Story by Lori Ozzello | Photographs by Kevin Moloney

Whirling disease seemed unbeatable.

The disease stumped aquatic researchers in the mid 1990s and decimated the state's wild rainbow trout population. It tolerated extreme temperatures and could lie dormant in silt for years. Biologists devised ways to rid state hatcheries of the invasive disease, but they struggled to somehow inoculate or protect the wild trout.

Read more: What a Nuisance

Water for the Birds

How Colorado, Nebraska, Wyoming and the Feds Figured It Out

Story by Jayla Ryan Poppleton

It's no wonder, once you understand the competing interests involved, that it took 12 years for Colorado, Wyoming and Nebraska to hash out a deal to send water downstream on the Platte River for three rare birds and a fish. The three-state agreement, formally the Platte River Recovery Implementation Program, officially began in January 2007.

Read more: Water for the Birds

Welcome Nicole Seltzer!

By Jayla Ryan Poppleton

The Colorado Foundation for Water Education's new executive director, Nicole Seltzer, began Dec. 3.

Read more: Welcome Nicole Seltzer!

Hero, Justice, Gentle Man—Felix Sparks

By Justice Gregory J. Hobbs, Jr.

They buried Felix Sparks with full military honors Oct. 2, 2007. The military chaplain said much about Sparks' service in the U.S. Army and the Colorado National Guard. Not much was said about his service as a Colorado Supreme Court justice and Colorado Water Conservation Board director.


Read more: Hero, Justice, Gentle Man—Felix Sparks

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