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Bringing you the quality water information you crave, over Colorado's radio airwaves and online. Our regular programming will complement what you're reading in Headwaters magazine and in the news.

Detecting Leaks with Data

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Colorado's growing population is putting pressure on water providers to come up with more and more of this precious resource. Conservation efforts have been increasing but utilities are also paying attention to water lost in the system through leaks. As part of our Connecting the Drops series, Hannah Leigh Myers went hunting for a leak with a Denver Water technician to get a closer look at the ever improving data systems and technology responsible for the decline in water lost in leaky public systems.

 

 Chris Garcia-DW Leak Techweb

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Pair Sound with Sight 

 DW Truck web
Since 2012, Denver Water has surveyed more than 4,600 miles of pipe and pinpointed nearly 1,100 leaks.
 Chris Garcia-DW Leak Techweb
Chris Garcia is a member of Denver Water's Leak Detection Unit.
 Highest Quality Audio Leak Techweb
Leak technicians use high quality audio equipment to listen for leaks.
 Audio Leak Test web
Denver Water leak technicians listen for unusual sound frequencies that might signal a leaky pipe.
 Listening for a Leakweb
 Magnetic transducers that are placed on pipes or valves will send frequencies to a computer which then helps the crew narrow down the leak's location on the pipe.

Using Real Time Data to Encourage Water Wise Habits

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What would it mean for your water use if you knew exactly how much water you were using in your home ... and exactly how much it was costing you? Would it change your behavior? Water providers and some home builders hope that having access to real-time data will help consumers use less. For Connecting the Drops, our state-wide radio series on water topics, CFWE's Caitlin Coleman reports. 

 SiemensOffice2Reneweb

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Read more: Using Real Time Data to Encourage Water Wise Habits

Monitoring for lead in schools

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When cost-cutting in Flint, Michigan raised lead contamination in local drinking water, the nation became aware that water can corrode pipes and carry dangerous amounts of lead. The failures in Flint may result in stronger rules nationwide for monitoring home drinking water. But schools are not part of these public tests. That's why Colorado legislators are proposing a bill to help more Colorado schools pay for testing lead in their drinking water. Meanwhile, some Colorado schools have taken on the cost themselves. For Connecting the Drops, Shelley Schlender reports. 

 School Drinking Water - 41

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Read more: Monitoring for lead in schools

Fluoridating water, one strategy for improving public health, experts say

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In Colorado, consuming fluoride in water is one inexpensive way to prevent tooth decay. Although fluoride is considered a contaminant, it is often diluted to reduce the concentration in locations with high naturally occuring fluoride, and added in others. Learn about Colorado Springs Utilities' use of fluoride in water in this new episode of Connecting the Drops.  

 COREY THIEL Fluoride Testingweb

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Read more: Fluoridating water, one strategy for improving public health, experts say

Recovering the Big Thompson River and its Economy

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Three years ago, flood waters rushed down the Big Thompson River through Estes Park and eastward to Loveland destroying whole stretches of the river channel and adjoining roads. That flood echoed a similar one 40 years ago that killed 144 people, destroyed countless homes and decimated the river bedNow, roads are being repaired and the ecosystem is slowly recovering, and that  recovery is crucial for the economy of local communities.  

 BT 4web

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Read more: Recovering the Big Thompson River and its Economy

Economics of the Colorado River

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It's been almost a century since the Colorado River compact was created, divvying up the resources of this mighty waterway between seven states and Mexico—that's almost 40 million people who rely on the river in some way. Traditionally the economic value of the river was based on what the water could be used for...agriculture, mining, industry. But as Maeve Conran reports for Connecting the Drops, more people are pointing to the economic value of keeping water in the river itself.

 

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Read more: Economics of the Colorado River

Pricing the Priceless

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How to put a price on the priceless...That's something that water utilties grapple with as they figure out what to charge customers for this precious resource. As part of Connecting the Drops, our statewide radio series on water issues, Maeve Conran takes a look at how water is priced and whether we're paying enough.

 Marsha Holmes web

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Read more: Pricing the Priceless

Rain barrels and water conservation tools

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Rainwater harvesting through rain barrels is now legal in Colorado. This comes after several years of debate and opposition from those concerned about possible impacts on downstream water users. Now, conservationists are eyeing them and other water capture tools as a way to stretch the state's overburdened supply.

 

 1web

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Read more: Rain barrels and water conservation tools

Climate and Water: The Shifting Hydrograph

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Researchers say climate change is already effecting Colorado farms and ranches-but not necessarily in the way people might expect. Because the state is so dry, farmers here rely on irrigation to raise their crops. But they, and climate researchers, are less concerned about there being enough water than when that water will be available. As Maeve Conran reports for our Connecting the Drops series, climate change means spring runoff is coming earlier, and that creates new challenges for farmers.  

 

 IMG 452web

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Read more: Climate and Water: The Shifting Hydrograph

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Connecting the Drops Partners

Connecting the Drops is a radio collaboration between the Colorado Foundation for Water Education and Colorado Community Radio Stations KGNU, KDNK and KRCC.

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 Support for 2017 programming comes from CoBank

  
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1750 Humboldt Street, Suite 200
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